Hillary Clinton taking heat for decades old audio recording - KATV - Breaking News, Weather and Razorback Sports

Hillary Clinton taking heat for decades old audio recording

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A controversy surrounding Hillary Clinton is gaining national attention. It's over an old case she worked as a defense attorney, representing a man on trial for rape in 1975.

Audio tapes published by a conservative website, and a subsequent interview with the rape victim by another media organization have some lobbing criticism at the former Secretary of State. The audio, obtained from the University of Arkansas library's special collections archives, captures Mrs. Clinton talking about the man she defended against a rape charge, a few years after he pleaded to a lesser charge.

On the tape, Clinton says, "He took a lie detector test. I had him take a polygraph, which he passed, which forever destroyed my faith in polygraphs." She chuckles after the making the comments. The implication that Clinton may have defended a guilty man, was followed up by an interview with the rape victim, who was critical of the former First Lady.

"The woman in question, the victim, she actually said in this most recent interview with the daily beast, you know, Hillary Clinton, she's supposed to be this champion of women, that's not how I feel about this situation," said Katie Glueck, with Politico.

But Clinton's defenders say she had an obligation to defend her client, and if you look at her career as a whole, bolstering women has been a clear priority. Mrs. Clinton has yet to respond to the criticism, and it's not clear she will have to anytime soon.

"Certainly possible someone could bring that up going forward, but we're just taking a look at her schedule over the next couple of days you see book signings. She does have a number of talks, but those are often conducted by people who tend to be more friendlier. They have a previous relationship," Glueck said.

It's also way too early to tell if this becomes an issue in a presidential campaign. Clinton has yet to officially begin one.

"It certainly has raised some questions, the way that people talk about it. Whether this will matter for her in another week is perhaps a different story," Glueck said.

The Dean of the University of Arkansas libraries has sent a letter to the "Free Beacon" accusing them of violating library rules by not requesting permission to publish the recordings. They've banned them from the archives and told them to return the tapes.
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