Highway Department wants to reduce wet weather crashes - KATV - Breaking News, Weather and Razorback Sports

Highway Department wants to reduce wet weather crashes

Posted: Updated:

(KATV)-The Arkansas Highway Department wants to help prevent crashes during wet weather. They'll be adding a treatment to some roads aimed at reducing crashes during rainy weather and will be placed in areas a car on wet pavement is most likely to skid out of control, curves and sudden stops.

"We're primarily looking as a vehicle approaches a curve, anywhere a motorist will be hitting their brakes, we're putting down an epoxy type coating with a very, very coarse aggregate, an aggregate that has much sharper edges that will increase the friction between the pavement and the tire," Randy Ort, spokesperson for the Arkansas Highway Department said.

The highway department has already began testing a similar treatment on interstates like I-30. Larger gravel allows the water to seep off the road instead of sit on it.

"The section of I-30 was one where we had seen higher than normal instances of crashes in wet weather. We have now put that down, I don't know if we have any results back yet because it's still fairly new," Ort said.

The highway department has identified areas that will receive treatment, which will be about 7 miles of road. The work will begin as the budget allows.

"We've identified about 22 specific locations around the state on nine different highways. we're primarily looking as a vehicle approaches a curve, anywhere a motorist will be hitting their brakes, we're putting down an epoxy type coating with a very, very coarse aggregate, an aggregate that has much sharper edges that will increase the friction between the pavement and the tire," Ort said.

The sections that will receive treatment are LaHarpe Boulevard in Little Rock and the highway department will also treat highway 5 in Garland, Saline, Lonoke and Baxter counties. Highway 7 in Clark, Garland and Boone counties, as well as highways 72, 102, 279 and 65.

"Anything that comes between the tires and the pavement, in this case moisture, can increase the number of crashes," Ort said.