Ark lawmakers respond to State of the Union Address - KATV - Breaking News, Weather and Razorback Sports

Ark lawmakers respond to State of the Union Address

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Arkansas' Washington delegation told KATV their thoughts on President Barack Obama's State of the Union Address Tuesday night.

Senator Mark Pryor said while he does not agree with every word the president said, he was pleased President Obama spent much of his speech talking about jobs and the economy, deficit and debt.

"We have a lot of work to do," Pryor said. "Arkansas has a good story to tell in terms of the economy. I think we do things right in our state. I just hope we can find common ground, keep working, and try to get this country moving in the right direction again."

Addressing gridlock in Washington, Pryor said there is "way too much." He says he's spent the last decade working in a bipartisan way.  "I'm encouraged right now because you've seen a lot of bipartisanship in the senate over the last six to eight weeks. That's very good. That's what the Senate ought to be doing. We should find those common-ground solutions and work together."

Senator John Boozman was in the chamber for the address. Boozman says the president's remarks were very general. "The problem is that there really wasn't a lot of talk about ‘hey get that paid for.' There were lots of promises but not very many specifics…we can't have this situation of lots of spending and borrowing then raising taxes."

When asked about the bickering between chambers, Senator Boozman said the nation has an opportunity to get things done with divided government. "Traditionally some of the great things that have happened in America, some of the great legislative proposals, have come out when you have divided government. There's really nobody to blame. In a sense you have to work together."

Congressman Tim Griffin said the president always gives a good speech but he's more concerned with the follow-through.

"The last couple of years he's talked a lot of good things about reforming the tax code, for example. The real test is not how good of a speech he gives, but what he follows up with."